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Local Heroes Honored for Saving OCU Student's Life

The quick action of staff members and first responders saved an Ohio Christian University (OCU) athlete’s life and their actions were recognized at a ceremony on Thursday.

On August 25, Katelynn Ising, 21, of Groveport, had just finished a drill during soccer practice and had stepped off the field when she went into cardiac arrest.

OCU President Dr. Mark Smith said he was watching a volleyball game when he heard there was a student down. Smith had previously worked in rescue squad for five years and knew a quick response was needed.

 

“I saw CPR being performed and I knew we had a crisis,” Smith said. “Today we celebrate a life because of heroes who worked tirelessly for a few moments to save a life.”

 

The Pickaway County Sheriff’s Office and the Circleville Fire Department recognized Tyler Payne, chief of OCU security; Nicole Lewis, OCU athletic trainer and Justin Schleich, deputy sheriff, with a plaque for their efforts in saving Ising’s life before EMS arrived at the scene.

 

Also recognized for their quick response to an emergency situation were Adam Swingle, OCU assistant women’s soccer coach; Ben Bellman, OCU athletic director; Cpt. Arron Kerns, Circleville Fire Department; Circleville Fire Chief Marc Zingarelli; Jake Warren, OCU head women’s soccer coach and Dr. Mark Smith, OCU president.

 

It was determined that Ising has right ventricular dysplasia, a condition common in athletes ages 17 to 24. The issue can be genetic. “I lost memory for about a week and woke up in the hospital,” Ising said.

 

Ising had an automatic defibrillator implanted in her chest and has been taking it easy the last few months. She is not allowed to exercise or work and is on daily medication. She is currently taking one online class and her goal is to get back to playing soccer, which she has been doing since she was 3-years-old.

 

“The doctors told me I was one of very few to walk out after this,” Ising said. Kerns said that Ising had to be defibrillated on the field.

 

“This young lady right here is a testament that CPR works,” Kerns said. “If it wasn’t for CPR, we may not be having this presentation.”

 

Zingarelli also stressed the importance of knowing CPR. He said that it typically takes EMS four to six minutes to respond to a scene and at six minutes, a person starts to loose brain cells.

 

Zingarelli said that Ising is alive, walking and talking because of CPR.