BA in Emergency & Disaster Management

4th
4th
Ranked 4th among online Christian colleges
OCU ranks 4th among the “Top 8 online Christian Colleges and Universities in 2017” according to www.thebestcolleges.org. Ranking is by graduation, retention and acceptance rates, student-teacher ratios, tuition costs, years of accreditation, reputation, awards, and job placement records.
$300K
$300K
OCU awards $300K+ in scholarships in annual Scholars Day competition

This program offers students preparation and qualifications for work in government, non-profit, and private emergency response organizations. Fieldwork, coupled with a rigorous academic program, helps ensure graduates are knowledgeable, proficient and experienced.

Objectives

On completion of the program, students should be able to:
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    Evidence competence in the field of Emergency and Disaster Management in preparation for private or public-sector employment.
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    Apply theoretical and practical knowledge of Emergency and Disaster Management for saving lives and property from the impacts of crises, emergencies and disasters.
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    Integrate a Christian worldview into critical thinking and decision-making related to the field of Emergency and Disaster Management.
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    Analyze the existing and desired structure, climate, and culture of organizations whose focus is Emergency and Disaster Management.
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    Analyze an organization’s operation and provide recommendations for improvement.

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE 49 HOURS

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    Designed to support students experiencing academic, personal, and spiritual transition to Ohio Christian University. Academic advising, finances, time management, study skills, and resources available to students. Overview of what new students can expect from a university experience. Acclimation to the unique OCU community environment.
    Offered: Fall Prerequisites: None
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    Developing and maintaining a healthy lifestyle for achieving individual potential in all dimensions of wellness. Includes creation of short- and long-term fitness goals and fitness assessment activities for healthy habits. Required for all students.
    Offered: Spring Prerequisites: None
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    Weekly chapel services and other events designed to integrate spiritual, academic, and community life, and to engage the campus community in worship, biblically rooted teaching, and a deepening relationship with Jesus Christ.
     
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    Classroom introduction to the Christian Service program, including the rationale, policies, and procedures for Christian Service at Ohio Christian University, and field engagement in approved service learning experiences, including ministry and response to the needs of the community.
     
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    Field engagement in approved service learning experiences, including ministry and response to the needs of the community. This course does not have a scheduled class time. To earn credit, students independently arrange service opportunities with the approval of the Christian Service instructor, and submit online reports.
     

SF100 and CS071 requirements are prorated in certain instances.

REASONING SKILLS7 HOURS

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    Mathematical thinking encountered in college courses, careers, and everyday life. Quantitative reasoning skills needed to understand problem solving, money management, and growth models.
    Prerequisite: SI094 (recommended), SI092, SI096, or ACT math score of 19 or higher
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    Science Elective with Lab 4

COMMUNICATION SKILLS 9 HOURS

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    An introductory study of composition emphasizing writing as a process (prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing). Assignments focus on the different styles and uses of argument. Students gain and refine skills of developing a thesis, organizing content, controlling tone, and expressing ideas in clearly communicated language. In addition, students conduct library research and incorporate researched material into papers using APA format.
    Offered: Fall Prerequisite: None
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    An intermediate course designed to extend and refine students’ expository and creative writing experiences. Student writing will reflect university-level writing skills, such as principles of logical/critical thinking and reasoning, effective organization, APA research and documentation, and content-rich development of ideas.
    Offered: Spring Recommended: LA101
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    Skills for effective and professional business communications in written, oral, and non-verbal forms, including communication theory, business communication principles, developing and delivering oral presentations, composing business messages, and preparing business reports.
    Offered: Spring Prerequisite: None

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 6 HOURS

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    A comprehensive survey of the field of psychology, including historical and theoretical foundations, with special emphasis on contemporary scientific research and empirical applications, within a Christian perspective and a biopsychosocial approach.
    Offered: Spring Prerequisite: None
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    The scientific study of society, institutions, and group interaction, with focus on the sociological imagination and core theories. Topics include the sociological perspective, the individual in society, stratification and social inequality, social intuitions, human ecology, and social change, with special attention to issues of diversity.
    Offered: Fall Prerequisite: None

HUMANITIES 11 HOURS

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    Fine Arts Electives 2
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    Literature Elective3
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    History Elective3
Choose one of the following:
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    Overview of philosophical vocabulary and concepts, and a historical survey of the development of western philosophy. Basic understanding of the main currents in western thought and their relationships to each other.
    Offered: Fall Prerequisite: None
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    Introduction to logic and ethics including methodologies for applying those disciplines in Christian ministry and other vocations. Induction and deduction, principles of clean statement and valid reasoning, and fallacies. Moral theories of philosophical schools and their relationship to the development of a biblical ethic.
    Offered: Spring Prerequisite: None

GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES3 HOURS

BIBLICAL LITERATURE, RELIGION, AND THEOLOGY 11 HOURS

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    Introduction to the New Testament narrative and teachings that constitute the Gospel message about Jesus Christ. Special attention to the narratives found within the four Gospels, their relationship to one another and the Book of Acts. Basic instruction in inductive Bible study method. Note: NT102 is a prerequisite for all other New Testament courses.
    Offered: Spring Prerequisite: None
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    Introduction to the Old Testament narrative with special attention to the Torah (the first five books). Emphasis on historical backgrounds, origins of the Israelite nation, and Hebrew worship. Note: OT101 is a prerequisite for all other Old Testament courses.
    Offered: Fall Prerequisite: None
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    Introduction to worldview and a survey of the plurality of worldviews in western culture. Special attention to the Christian worldview and how competing worldviews challenge and reinforce it. Basic instruction in creedal Christianity assists students in understanding and embracing the uniqueness of Christianity, enabling more effective communication of the Christian faith.
    Offered: Every semester Prerequisite: None
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    The Christian experience of spiritual redemption and sanctification examined in the light of its scriptural foundations as taught by theologians within the Wesleyan/Armenian tradition. Designed for non-religion majors.
    Offered: Every semester Prerequisites: TH100, OT101, NT102

MANAGEMENT MAJOR45 HOURS

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    History and origins of emergency management in the United States, including key disaster incidents, legislation and Presidential actions that impacted change within the emergency management profession. Emergency management relevance in private industry and awareness about opportunities in the public and private sectors of emergency management.
    Offered: Fall Prerequisite: None
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    Public awareness of potential hazards communities face, the preparedness needed to handle these hazards and strategic options in mitigating adverse consequences. Procedures and principles for emergency operations, including planning, warning systems, evacuation, search and rescue, mass casualty incidents, sheltering, handling donations, disaster declarations, and incident debriefings.
    Offered: Fall, even semester Prerequisite: EM101
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    Post-disaster procedures and policies governing the protection of natural environments, improving disaster resistance, supporting diverse communities and population, improving economic conditions, and preserving community resources. Community resilience and sustainability through emergency management programs. Phases of emergency management in a community’s comprehensive and strategic planning.
    Offered: Spring, odd semester Prerequisite: EM101
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    Equipping individuals and nonprofit organizations to manage, achieve, and preserve financial strength to carry out their missions. Organizing, structuring, and presenting a project for successful grant funding from public or private sources.
    Offered: Fall Prerequisite: None
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    Development of knowledge and personal disciplines for managing one’s emotional, physical, and spiritual needs in maintaining a prolonged presence in settings of high stress.
    Offered: Spring Prerequisite: EM101
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    Planning and management for business or operational restoration following a crisis, with emphasis on minimizing the impact the crisis can have on business operations.
    Offered: Spring, odd semester Prerequisites: EM101,
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    Responding to the economic, psychological, emotional and spiritual loss disasters create for a population. Innovation and effective solutions for recovery managers handling these impacts.
    Offered: Fall, even semester Prerequisites: EM 200-level courses
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    The role of political systems in disaster policy during all phases of emergency management. Practical information drawn from disaster policy studies and case studies applicable to future disasters and emergencies.
    Offered: Fall, odd semester Prerequisite: EM101
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    Exercise design, development, and evaluation, Knowledge and skills essential to implementing a Homeland Security Exercise Evaluation Program (HSEEP). Incorporating emergency exercise planning to effectively prepare and respond to disasters, emergencies, and crises of all types and magnitudes. Required design and development of a tabletop exercise to be executed at the end of the semester.
    Offered: Spring, even semester All EM 300-level courses
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    Managing operations during all phases of emergency management with emphasis on the recovery phase. Issues include donation management (finance and resources), managing volunteers, crisis counseling, and basic subsistence needs. Fundamental management methods based on FEMA methodologies.
    Offered: Fall, odd semester All EM 300-level courses
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    Hazard mitigation in emergency and disaster management. Properties of hazardous materials, development and implementation of plans and programs required for safe response, and the use of tools and techniques for responses to spills and releases.
    Offered: Spring, even semester Prerequisite: EM101
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    Issues and dilemmas encountered in the international development field: history, concepts and theories of the field; the role of non-profits as global players; urgent development issues in the non-Western world; current dilemmas for action; key actors and institutions who shape the development field; the role of emergency management in international development.
    Offered: Spring, odd semester Prerequisite: EM101
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    Placement in an area of the world that has been affected by a disaster, either foreign or domestic. This 90-hour internship includes all phases of emergency management: preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation. Students gain valuable experience and apply knowledge gained in course work. To enroll for the course, students must complete the internship package provided by the Director, Emergency and Disaster Management. Students are responsible to arrange the internship.
    Offered: On demand Prerequisite: EM101, permission of EM Program Director, or SBG Dean
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    Methods and tools to interpret, evaluate, and analyze business data and determine the appropriate statistical methods for decision-making in business, especially the interpretation and integrity of charts, graphs, and other numerical and statistical presentation of data. The use of probability, distribution, sampling, simple linear regression, and correlation analysis in the presentation of business information.
    Offered: Spring Prerequisite: GenEd Math Requirement

PROFESSIONAL ENGAGEMENT0 HOURS

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    Student interaction with leaders in the field, including discussion of how emergency management theory and practice coincide.
    Offered: See department schedule Prerequisite: None Pass/Fail
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    Students engage with government leaders from various levels of government in Washington D.C. to discuss how government theory and practice coincide.
    Offered: Every spring Prerequisite: None Pass/Fail
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    Roundtables with business leaders in small, medium, and large businesses demonstrate how theory and practice come together in the actual experiences of significant business people. Students interact and network with these business leaders during and after the roundtables.
    Offered: Every semester Prerequisite: None Pass/Fail
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    Students engage with significant experts and nationally recognized thought leaders hosted by the School of Business & Government.
    Offered: Every semester Prerequisite: None Pass/Fail
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    Offers students an opportunity to hear from accomplished business and leadership experts and see how a Christian worldview is applied in business and other leadership roles.
    Offered: Spring Prerequisite: None Pass/Fail
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    Practical strategies and skills for career searches, job interviews, resume creation, networking, and career portfolio development. Developing career goals and plans. Includes six workshops and a networking dinner.
    Offered: Every semester Prerequisite: None Pass/Fail
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    Students interact with business leaders from investment firms and other businesses on Wall Street to discuss how investment theory and practice coincide.
    Offered: Spring Prerequisite: None Pass/Fail

ELECTIVES26 HOURS

Any credit-bearing course, 100-level or above

Program Total120 Hours

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