The Summer Institute provides busy professionals, K-12 teachers, and university professors the opportunity to complete graduate level courses to qualify for discipline-area instruction. We also provides onsite and online undergraduate as well as Trailblazer/Dual Enrollment students the opportunity to complete 8-week courses over the summer at a reduced per-credit rate.

Please note: A course will be cancelled if the minimum enrollment requirement of 3 students is not met. Also, Students are responsible for the cost of the course. Financial aid is not available for Summer Institute courses.

Following are examples of the courses offered during the Summer Institute:

Master of Education Degree Program

Ohio Christian University invites you to join our next cohort scheduled to begin July 14, 2021.  Master of Ed Program requires an application and acceptance into the program.

  • $338 per credit hour
  • Graduate-level classes
  • Starting July 14, 2021
  •  
    EDU5000 Current Trends and Topics in  Education3 Credits

Courses for Teachers and Professors

  • 6-week, 3 credit hour courses
  • Graduate - level classes
  • $330 per credit hour
  • Starting June 1, 2021

Communications

  •  
    (3 credits) 6 weeks This course examines the theories and practices in communication studies. Students will review the historical development of communication while considering the influence of technology advances that continues to shape the definition of good communication between individuals, small groups, and organizations.
    (Prerequisite: Graduate Admission)
  •  
    This course examines the theories and applications of inter- cultural communication. Students will explore their own cultural identities through a variety of cultural frames by considering the emotional, nonverbal, and verbal elements of communication. Specific contexts for intercultural communication are studied including friendship, family, school, workplace, the media, and travel.
     

Mathematics

  •  
    MAT5000 introduces students to the development of mathematics across time, geography, and culture within a Biblical worldview. Students will consider how these influences shape the study and instruction of mathematics, with attention given to quantitative reasoning, covariational reasoning, and problem-solving play in learning major ideas of mathematics.
    (Prerequisite: Must meet graduate admissions standards.)
  •  
    MAT5100 introduces students to basic concepts of probability. Topics include sample spaces, computation rules, discrete and continuous probability distributions, random variables, multivariate distributions, and the Central Limit Theorem. Students are expected to be familiar with single-variable differential and integral calculus.
    (Prerequisite: Must meet graduate admissions standards.)

English

  •  
    ENG5000 introduces students to the theories and pedagogies that influence composition studies in the digital age. Students will review the practices and ideals that have shaped the teaching of composition within a Biblical worldview while also considering how digital media transforms the definition of good writing in the academy and the workplace.
    (Prerequisite: Must meet graduate admissions standards.)
  •  
    ENG5100 introduces students to the theories and pedagogies that influence composition instruction within a Biblical worldview through Writing in the Disciplines (WID) practice. Within this context, students will examine the specific needs and requirements that shape scholarly research and writing in the humanities, social sciences, business, ministry, and medicine. Students will also consider the transformative nature of WID practice to improve content retention through the integration of structured peer review and instructor response within an online modality.
    (Prerequisite: Must meet graduate admissions standards.)

Special Topic, 1 Credit Hour Courses

  • Class schedules vary per course
  • Available to all
  • $155 per credit hour
  • CEUs only $5
  • Offered June 7-11, 2021
  •  
    EDU5120 Google Classroom (06/07 - 06/08)1 Credit
  •  
    EDU5130 Orton-Gillingham (06/07 - 06/11)
      Additional course fee and materials $250 to Pickaway County ESC-1
    1 Credit
  •  
    EDU5140 The Science of Reading (06/09 - 06/10)
      (re: Ohio’s Literacy Achievement Initiative)
    1 Credit
  •  
    EDU5150 Ohio’s Whole Child Framework (06/11)1 Credit

Courses for Traditional, Online Plus & Trailblazer Academy Students

  • $155 per credit hour
  • 3 Credit Hour Courses
  • 8 Weeks Each Course
  • Available for Undergraduates
  • Entirely online
  • Starting June 1, 2021
  •  
    The double-entry system of bookkeeping and the basic accounting cycle, including communicating financial information according to generally accepted accounting principles.
    Prerequisite: College-level mathematics courses, higher than MAT1000
  •  
    The acquisition, analysis, and reporting of financial information for the individual manager and the organization with special attention to the planning and control responsibilities of practicing managers. Students should gain confidence in their ability to interpret and use financial information for more effective decision-making.
    Prerequisite: ACC2020
  •  
    Observational basics of movements in the sky, the history of modern astronomy, the solar system, the Sun, other stars, the Milky Way, other galaxies, the Universe, and cosmogony. Required telescope viewing events will be weather-dependent.
    Prerequisite: AST2010
  •  
    The background, events, people, and theology of the Old Testament with reflection on connections to the New Testament and application to Christian faith and life.
     
  •  
    The contexts of the New Testament, including cultural and geographical settings, and the political arena of the New Testament, and the application of this knowledge to understanding the New Testament.
     
  •  
    Examination of human activities at global and regional scales, exploring population distributions, economies, religions, and political and social behaviors, with tension between globalization and cultural diversity as a central theme. The course is an attempt to discover where people are and why they are there, focusing on methods used by geographers and application of those tools.
     
  •  
    A review of basic math functions with emphasis on real-world application, including fundamentals of banking, pricing, payroll, interest, reading and analyzing financial statements, taxes, insurance, and investments, and application of these concepts to situations in business and personal life.
     
  •  
    This course centers on investigating business feasibility. Areas of study will include recognizing business opportunities, developing the business concept, and testing an opportunity for feasibility. Startup and takeover situations will be studied. Business plans will be created.
     
  •  
    Theoretical and practical problems of ethical behavior and decision-making in the workplace, and development of a biblically based framework for moral and ethical issues.
     
  •  
    An introductory study of composition emphasizing writing as a process (prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing). Assignments focus on the different styles and uses of argument. Students gain and refine skills of developing a thesis, organizing content, controlling tone, and expressing ideas in clearly communicated language. In addition, students conduct library research and incorporate researched material into papers using APA format.
     
  •  
    ENG2100 is an introduction to the basic terms and genres with emphasis on British and American works as models. This course also serves as the prerequisite to other literature courses in the English major. By exploring literature through a Christ-centered lens, students will discover new strategies to synthesize the tenets of a theistic worldview in all of their scholarly research and coursework.
     
  •  
    This course considers selected poems and plays by Shakespeare. Attention is given to canonical works by genre (comedy, tragedy, history, or romance).
    (Prerequisites: ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100)
  •  
    Western Civilization from the Ancient Age through the Medieval Age with a focus on the development of societies, ideas, politics, and people.
     
  •  
    Significant events, ideas, issues, institutions, and personalities, with political, social, and economic developments in US History from 1492 to 1877.
     
  •  
    An introduction to human resources functions and how they support the strategic objectives and goals of an organization.
     
  •  
    The roles of managers in creating and modifying organizations to fulfill the organizational mission, including analysis of interaction in an organization, and the goals, priorities, and strategies of employees.
     
  •  
    A comparative study of major world religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam and Christianity.
     
  •  
    The interacting marketing activities of analysis, planning, implementation, and control with a focus on competitive and customer analysis, marketing strategy development, and implementations for decision-making in domestic and global organizations. The course incorporates current developments in marketing, including the social, legal, ethical, and technological environments of marketing. Students apply these skills and concepts in a real marketing situation to make recommendations for marketing strategy and tactics.
     
  •  
    Introduction to logic and ethics including methodologies for applying those disciplines in Christian ministry and other vocations. Induction and deduction, principles of clean statement and valid reasoning, and fallacies. Moral theories of philosophical schools and their relationship to the development of a biblical ethic.
     
  •  
    Introduction to the fields of Political Theory, U.S. Politics, and International Relations with emphasis on learning to identify and evaluate arguments and the evidence that authors use to support them.
    Prerequisite: Writing course
  •  
    An analysis of the influence of the media on the opinions of the citizenry and public policy with special emphasis on the interaction among the media, elected officials, and interest groups.
    Prerequisite: Writing course
  •  
    A holistic study of the individual in the total span of life from birth through senior adulthood as a foundation for understanding human development, including the process of human growth and development, the needs in the major life stages and the biblical perspective of human development.
     
  •  
    Critical thinking about the major personality theories, focusing on major features and underlying assumptions of each theory, with attention to the use of new and long-standing theories as they apply to modern thinking and behaviors in light of the principles of Scripture.
    Prerequisite: any introductory psychology course.
  •  
    Introduction to worldview and a survey of the plurality of worldviews in western culture. Special attention to the Christian worldview and how competing worldviews challenge and reinforce it. Basic instruction in creedal Christianity assists students in understanding and embracing the uniqueness of Christianity, enabling more effective communication of the Christian faith.
     
  •  
    Fundamental concepts of chemical dependency and addiction treatment, including views from science, sociology, criminology, family studies, and a Christian and biblical worldview. Development of a personalized view of chemical dependency, addiction, and treatment.
     

These Undergraduate courses are part of our TEL Library Partnership

TEL courses are self-paced and provided through OCU’s partnership with TEL Library. The science courses are 3 credits and include a required lab component.

  • $155 per credit hour
  • 4 Credit Hour Courses
  • 8 Weeks Each Course
  • Available for Undergraduates
  • Entirely online
  • Starting June 1, 2021
  •  
    Major concepts of biology, emphasizing cell structure and function, heredity, plant and animal organization, taxonomy, and ecology. Weekly laboratory activity. Recommended: High school biology Lab
  •  
    Basic concepts of chemistry including the scientific method, metric system, structure of atoms, the periodic table, chemical bonds, mole concept, chemical calculations, states of matter, gas laws, solutions, acids, bases and salts, oxidation/reduction reactions, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Weekly laboratory activity. Recommended: High school algebra or chemistry with a grade of C or above Lab
  •  
    Basic concepts of physics, chemistry, and astronomy. Logical and philosophical development of the concepts and their application to the understanding of the physical universe. Laboratory application of scientific method and measurement in scientific investigation. Recommended: High school algebra or chemistry Lab
  •  
    Pre-calculus algebra, including equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, sequences, series, and probability.
  •  
    Mathematical thinking encountered in college courses, careers, and everyday life. Quantitative reasoning skills needed to understand problem solving, money management, and growth models.
  •  
    Principles of speech composition, outlining, and delivery, including preparing and presenting speeches to introduce, inform, and persuade. Immediate application of these principles in current work and ministry is encouraged.

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